Will These Potatoes Be Safe To Eat?

Okay, everyone, I have a serious question. Some of you may snigger and laugh, but I’m being serious!  Here is the background of my dilema: In my garden at my SacramentoValley home (past posts about my garden can be seen here) I planted two purple fingerling potatoes as an experiment.  I have never grown potatoes before and wanted to try it out, especially since I had one in the bag that really wanted to grow and not be eaten.  🙂  I cut it in half since it had growth on both ends and planted the two pieces using the cloth bag method.  Apparently by growing potatoes in a cloth bag, when they are ready to be harvested you just turn the bag over and dump the contents and – voila – there are the potatoes.  We’ll see, but so far everything seems to be growing right along.

These are the two purple potato plants I started from one potato that decided it wanted to live and not be eaten!  I cut the potato in half and planted them using the "bag"method.  They seem to be happy so far

These are the two purple potato plants I started from one potato that decided it wanted to live and not be eaten! I cut the potato in half and planted them using the “bag”method. They seem to be happy so far

On our future homestead property in the mountains we discovered some potatoes growing on their own in our old compost pile.  Apparently one of the last things I added to the old compost pile last fall was potatoes.  We started on a new compost pile through the winter but it has yet to begin really composting much, and it is a pretty soggy mess at this point.  I think the last of the potatoes I threw in the old compost pile were small reds and yukon golds, and by judging from their growth, they seem to be pretty happy.

These are the volunteer potatoes growing in the compost pile.  Not sure whether they are yukon golds or baby reds - or both.  They seem to be healthy and happy, but if we eat them when the time comes will they make us unhealthy and unhappy?

These are the volunteer potatoes growing in the compost pile. Not sure whether they are yukon golds or baby reds – or both. They seem to be healthy and happy, but if we eat them when the time comes will they make us unhealthy and unhappy?

Herein lies the question:  will these potatoes be safe to eat when harvest time comes?  Here’s why I wonder:  we read in several different sources that you can directly pee on a compost pile to add nitrogen, so most of the male persons who came up to visit us enjoyed “fertilizing” our compost pile.   The last fertilizing came probably in late November or early December, when we started the next compost pile.  We first started noticing the potatoes in March.

So, what do you think?  Will they be safe to eat by the time harvest comes?  Any advice is greatly appreciated!  Thanks.

”Simple

https://i2.wp.com/www.anoregoncottage.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/jtgpfinal.png?w=150

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

28 thoughts on “Will These Potatoes Be Safe To Eat?

    • Thanks for your comment, Michelle. We are hoping that the winter snow and rain washed anything questionable out of the compost, but aren’t sure.

  1. YES! so long as they are not:
    -Green
    -Soft/Mushy
    -Have empty dark cores inside
    they are totally safe to eat! potato plants love compost, as do things like squash and you can grow them directly in the compost pile. There are many different ways you can grow spuds, in burlap bags, containers, in the ground or even in a pile of straw. I’ve had two potato harvest in the past week from potatoes that were in beds under the snow all winter and they are totally fine! I found the odd one that was closer to the surface and weren’t good for eating, but so long as they look and feel like regular potatoes they should be totally good to eat!

    • Yeah – the guys seemed to enjoy the fact that it was okay to “water” the compost! Me being female, not so much. I am assuming that by the time they need to be harvested they will be okay. Thanks for your comment!

  2. Thanks so much for visiting my blog! Planting potatoes is next on my ‘to-do” list. I am going to try the “bag” method this year, just like you are.I have purchased two different varieties to try. I bet that you have an amazing harvest from that compost pile. Tons of room and tones of nutrients. Start boiling the water!

    • I know, right?! Those compost potatoes are getting bigger and bigger every day, but then so are the ones I planted! I love reading around on other blogs. I sure get a lot of information from them. I’m sure we will be talking again soon! Thanks for your comments.

  3. Pee is pretty sterile, just really high in nitrogen. Now if you were pooping in the compost pile, it would be a different story! Plus, just think of all the photo ops 😉

    • Yeah, as far as I know there hasn’t been any poop in the pile unless a forest critter took the opportunity. But, I read somewhere that peeing actually keeps unwanted critters away because they smell human scent and keep away. Don’t know if that’s true because I would think the opposite is true – as in an animal marking their territory over another’s. Anyhow, I think we will let mother nature take it’s course and if there are potatoes to be harvested, we will certainly try them!

  4. I have no idea! I know you’re supposed to pee on lemon trees, but that seems different cause it’s not like you’re actually weeing on the lemons themselves.
    It’s a tough one!
    Sorry for the delayed IBOT comment. I’ve had a crazy week! Better late than never though right?

    • What? I’ve never heard of peeing on a lemon tree!!! Well, that will give the boys another excuse! Thanks for the comment!

  5. They will be peetatoes. I’m not sure if they would be safe or not but my general rule about food is if its been urinated on I don’t eat it. But that’s just me.

  6. How funny! I’m going to try growing potatoes here for the first time this summer…and I just started composting…I’m just hoping my kids never read about how to add nitrogen to the compost. I can see that getting out of hand around here!

    • Yes – It seems all the guys enjoyed contributing. We don’t have chickens (or any animals) yet and that’s how some people add nitrogen to their compost. It also added just a bit of moisture, to keep the compost thermophyllic. Thanks for your comment!

  7. I say yes they are safe to eat. If you can compost with manure from horses and chickens and it is safe to eat hen your potatoes are safe. Urine can be drank if nessessary and is in space and survival circumstances. The gound has strained and recycled the nutrients in the compost .

    Happy French fries!

  8. I just bought a compost bin a few months ago and when I went out today there were long potato shoots growing! I also wondered if they would be OK to eat and no one pees in mine! Lol

    • Haha – well, I can tell you that we ate those potatoes, they were delicious, and no one got sick! Thanks, Sue, for stopping by to read my blog today!

  9. I was glad to read your blog and comments. I had a volunteer potato plant come up from a “winter” compost. I decided to work around it. I added a ring of wire fencing -about 2 ft wide by 4 ft tall. As the potato plant has grown, I’ve layered in more soil and brown leaves. The plant continues to look healthy. It is about 6″ above the cage and the cage is just about full of dirt and leaves. I have no idea what type of potato is forming or when they will be good to harvest. But I am looking forward to seeing how many and how large my free potatos are.

    • All right! Pennies from Heaven! Potatoes growing in the compost pile is apparently a very common story, but most of us aren’t smart enough to put the cage around it. Genius! I would love to hear how everything works out, so come back when you harvest… or sooner!

      • I’ll do that. I’ve never grown potatoes successfully. Any idea how long it will be till they are ready to harvest? From what I’ve read, I can harvest when the plant turns yellow – but I don’t know if that will be August or October.

        • Hmmmmm, I guess that would depend on your growing region. I just harvested mine when it was apparent the plant itself was on a rapid decline! I have been growing my potatoes in towers lately, and apparently some of them like to play peek-a-boo at harvest time, only to show up the next spring. If I can, I just leave these and plant the new potatoes around them. Happy gardening!

PLEASE LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS AND/OR QUESTIONS BY CLICKING HERE!!!