Update on our Building Plans

Yes.  I know.  I haven’t posted anything for a while.

We have been busy, busy, busy.

Yeah – snow.   Yippee… not!                          But seriously, the winter that we stay up here the whole time in our tiny cottage, we have had record rain and lots of snow!

 

We have also had lots of rain and snow, computer problems (darn hackers), along with limited data availability to blog because we are using up all our data researching stuff for our new home!

We are preparing to submit our plans for the second time to the plan checker for our county soon. We are building with a product called Faswall, which is an alternative building product, so the county is being a bit nit-picky with their code requirements.  The only thing holding us up right now are the corrections for electrical plans.  We gave them to the guy we thought was going to be our contractor about a month ago who said he would do the corrections for us, but he has yet to get back to us on them. Perhaps this is a sign that we shouldn’t hire him.  The electrical plans were mostly done the first time we submitted.  So, to keep the ball rolling, we are contacting another guy to see how much he will charge to complete the electrical plans for us. Harrumph!The newest house plans

In the meantime, we have been doing a lot of planning and shopping and dreaming.  First, we saw this building in Sonora, California, that we just fell in love with!  Since we will have quite a bit of retaining wall, built with concrete block, we really liked how it looked with the gray brick.  Stunning!  So, we went searching for gray brick to use as wainscotting on the outside of the house, accents for the top of the retaining walls and bricking up some columns.  We will also use the brick for the facing of the masonry heater inside.

Believe it or not, even though gray is becoming one of the more traditional colors for brick, we had a hard time finding some. We finally found this brick at a brick yard in South Sacramento.  It doesn’t have the variegation of light and dark gray that I like in the picture above, but it does have some variety and it is fairly rustic looking, so I think this is what we will end up with!

Gray Brick

I think it’s beautiful, what do you think?

Then, while in Sacramento, we went to IKEA to shop around looked at their kitchen cabinets.  My sister remodeled her home a few years ago, and used IKEA cabinets in her kitchen and has been very happy with them.  In fact, I helped put her cabinets together! Since we are building our home on a strict budget, the cabinets are fairly easy for the do-it-yourselfer to install, and they wear well, we are ALMOST certain we will use these.  In fact, here is a computerized picture I drew up on their website tool of what our kitchen could look like with the IKEA cabinets.

I love the way this kitchen looks. Gray cabinets, classic subway tile backsplash, medium brown wood floors.  The range, refrigerator, vent hood and dishwasher will all be stainless steel.

The only problem is that we haven’t decided what color to use.  The style of this cabinet comes in gray or off-white.  I know that gray cabinets are becoming all the rage, which is one reason I am reticent to use them, but we only have one window in the kitchen, and that window faces north and is covered with 12 feet of patio cover, which would make the kitchen fairly dark.  Yes, we are installing one of those solar tube thingys (don’t know which one, yet) over the kitchen island, but with dark wood floors and gray cabinets, we are afraid that the kitchen would be just too dark!

Old kitchen

I loved my old kitchen in the valley. This is a picture of the breakfast nook right next to the kitchen, which shows the white cabinets and wood floor. I am thinking that white cabinets might actually be the way to go,.

Now, the truth is that I love white kitchen cabinets.  I had white cabinets in the house we had before we move up here to our homestead and absolutely loved them!  We had medium dark brown laminate floors and I was obsessed with that combination. The problem?  I want a farmhouse sink.  The one IKEA sells.  The farmhouse sink is white white but the cabinets are just slightly off-white.  Yes, IKEA sells cabinets that are white white and would look good with the sink, it’s just that the style of the white-white cabinets are not mine.  They are just too modern for me.  I am more of a traditional gal.  Wood stained cabinets?  Well…  I don’t think they would look good with wood floors.  Too much wood for me.

What would you do?  I could sure use some advice on this one!

Another decision we have been researching (and researching) is the solar system that will power our off-grid house.  We attended a large “home show” in Sacramento, CA and a smaller one in Chico, CA and talked with quite a few solar companies.  Let me tell you, about 95% of the solar companies out there are for grid tied options only…  they don’t do off-grid.  In fact, some of the smaller companies who said they would do off grid didn’t know as much about off-grid solar as we do! When we started asking them questions about their systems and they talked to us about micro-inverters, we learned to politely walk away.  You don’t use microinverters in an off-grid application.  One guy even tried to tell us he would use the new Tesla Powerwall.  Well…  Um…  No.  We talked with Tesla representative last fall (after being on their list for almost a year!) and the Powerwall is NOT to be used for an off-grid application.  We politely walked away from that guy also. We have been dabbling with solar power on the homestead for several years now. We are running a 5 cubic foot freezer, our satellite TV receiver, flat screen TV, lights, a small refrigerator, and laptop and cellphone charges on a less than 1 kilowatt system with some generator back-up. (SEE HERE and HERE) We did find four companies that we feel would do a good job with our solar system, so to get a fair bid, we are asking each to give us a 4 kWh system to include everything needed for a complete off-grid situation, along with installation on a two story standing seam metal roof.  So far we have received only one bid.  We have also seen some pretty nice solar electric “kits” at online stores.  Renology is an online alternative energy store that has quite a few off-grid options.  Here is one we like:   renogy-4500-watt-48-volt-monocrystalline-solar-cabin-kit.  Another company Wholesalesolar has kit that is a bit more expensive, but may be more complete as it includes mounting racks: the-lodge-4.68-kw-18-panel-astronergy-off-grid-solar-system.  Of course, we would have to hire an electrician to hook it up for us, and that would add to the cost, so before we were to commit to something like that we would also need to get a quote for installation.  Plus, we would still have the cost of the batteries to back-up the whole system.

Decisions, decisions, decisions!

Right now we are also in the process of building a shed over our water well so that it can enclose the well head, a 500 gallon holding tank, a pressure pump and a booster pump.

You can see where the actual well head is with the concrete surrounding it. We plan to incorporate the concrete in a larger slab about 8 x 10, that will house all the pieces and parts of our water system that will supply both our house and our fire sprinkler system.

We had a local contractor (he is a fire sprinkler installer) give us a quote on a system he would install for us, including the water requirements (pump, booster pump, holding tank, pressure pump) and the requirements for the sprinkler system.  He said he would use all USA manufactured parts (something we desire if at all possible) and explained what we would need for the whole system to be up to code.  This is a bit tricky because of the required fire sprinkler system in our house which has certain pressure requirements, along with the water for the house.  Well, believe it or not, he lied to us about what we would need! He gave us the cadillac system with integrated this and that, and told us that it was code. When we called the county to verify, we realized that the chump was trying to over-sell us!  Arrrrruuuuugggggghhhhh! That was about two months ago. We found a company from a neighboring town who will do the job for a lot less. Then we had a local pump and well guy come up that said he could install just the water system (not the fire sprinkler system) and would send the quote on-line in a week or so, but never did. That was over a month ago. We don’t want that quote anymore.  ;(

What is with these guys?  Apparently we are on mountain time!

We found another guy who actually showed up when he was supposed to, gave us a quote we liked, lowered the quote because we are doing some of the work ourselves, and has returned every single one of our phone calls.  I will be proud to recommend him for any locals and I will show you his work when he is done.

So, let me know what you would do about the kitchen cabinets.  I had a friend suggest “kitchens to go” or something like that, so I will be doing more research into that during these next few weeks. Also, I have found a few possibilities at both Home Depot and Lowes.  Even though we haven’t even broken ground yet, I am researching these things now so we have a better idea of the costs involved.  Hopefully we will also be hearing from a few of the other solar companies we have contacted and will get some reasonable bids. There is one company I hope comes in with a great bid because the owner, Loren, has some other very innovative ideas regarding water heating along with the solar electric.

Okay – so now you are pretty much up to date with our lives at this point!  Please leave a comment if you have any ideas, questions, comments…  just click on the comment bubble next to the title of this post, but keep it family friendly, please!

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More Homebrewed Kelp Fertilizer

Last year Ray and I tried our hand at making kelp/seaweed fertilizer.  It was fairly easy to do and turned out great!  Unfortunately, because of our local Cinnamon bear (she has been around since she was a cub and her fur is reddish colored), I only got about ½ gallon of the stuff.  During our absence last winter…  well… you can see the damage she did if you click HERE

How to make kelp fertilizer

Make sure you get fresh seaweed. It’s easiest to get it when the ocean is at low tide.

So, we decided to try making some more.  We went to Fort Bragg, California, for the fourth of July Celebrations and on our last two days there collected an ice chest full of kelp and seaweed.  We weren’t selective because all of it breaks down into wonderful nutrients, though some are a bit more nutrient dense than others.  Bull kelp is known for being very nutrient dense. Unfortunately, there had not been any storms at sea, so there wasn’t a lot of kelp on the beach to choose from anyway.

Most seaweed, as well as kelp (which is a type of seaweed) is actually algae.  Why is decomposed/fermented algae good for your crops?  You see, unlike plants grown in your backyard garden or at the local farm, which can only take in nutrients available to the approximately 1 square foot of root space it has available in the soil, seaweed is able to take in a vast array of nutrients as the ocean currents pass over and through them.  So, while your garden soil may be deficient in boron or calcium, or have too many salts and remains that way without intervention, the ocean currents that feed the seaweed are constantly moving, churning and renewing, giving them a greater variety and volume of nutrients, which can then be fermented/decomposed into liquid gold for your plants.

Sounds great, right?

You can collect up to 10 pounds per day per person in California. An ice chest keeps the kelp cool for the trip home.

You can collect up to 10 pounds per day per person on California beaches. An ice chest lined with a plastic bag keeps the kelp cool for the trip home.

In our quest to be able to grow a lot of our own food, having nutrient rich soil in our garden and orchard is a must.  So, along with composting, we decided to make our own natural and organic fertilizer!

Making kelp fertilizer

The colors of the seaweed were beautiful. It reminded me of flowers under water!

The seaweed came in many colors this time – so gorgeous!  I spent about half an hour cleaning the sand, sand fleas, and other critters out of the seaweed, then soaked it all in cold, clean water for about a day.  This helps to leach a lot of the ocean salt out of the seaweed.

The seaweed was then placed into a 50 gallon barrel, with enough clean water to cover.  We put a screen on top to keep the flies out and – voila!! – the hard part was done!

WORD OF CAUTION:  You MUST stir the seaweed in the barrel at least every day.  Two or three times a day is better.  Why? Because you want the decomposition to be aerobic, not anaerobic.  Aerobic decomposition smells kinda bad.  Anaerobic decomposition downright stinks – really bad!

How to brew kelp fertilizer

Washing the kelp to get rid of salt, sand, critters, and any other contaminants.

Ray had an old wooden boat oar that we used to stir our fermenting brew and it came in very handy, as I was able to really give it a good stir around and easily scrape the bottom with it.  All I had the last time was a stick, which worked but was pretty inefficient.

How to make seaweed fertilizer

Our 50 gallon barrel. It worked well the last time, so we used it again. You can see the screen on top, the wooden oar beside and the spigot at the bottom. This is a pretty good set-up for making the kelp fertilizer

Unfortunately there was a few days when we were not at the homestead to stir the brew, it was mid summer and the temperatures were soaring.  When we came home I swear we could smell it before we even hit our street!

Ugh – phew.

Think…  old fashioned hair permanent mixed with cow barn in the middle of a prune dehydrator.  Whew it was bad.  So, believe me, you want to mix the brew EVERY DAY!

When is it done?  When it no longer stinks!!  Our first batch got to the point that it really didn’t stink, but this batch was different.  Let me tell you, I couldn’t wait for the day we would bottle it, and the truth is we may have bottled it up just a bit sooner than we should.  But after we let it decompose anaerobically by neglect, it never did get to that “ocean breeze” smell that it’s supposed to get to.  Stirring it very well several times a day for the next week or so did make it smell a bit better, but it really never did completely stop stinking.

When we went to the Heirloom Festival in Santa Rosa this year, we talked with a guy who knew about making kelp fertilizer, and explained how stinky it was when we hadn’t stirred it for a few days.  He suggested putting a fish tank aerator at the bottom of the barrel, run by a solar powered pump!  Great idea!  We still have to stir the brew, but at least it will be constantly aerated.  We are going to try that the next time we do this.

Eventually, after about two months, I decanted the fertilizer into gallon sized jugs.  We ended up with just about 12 gallons.  The solids that were left at the bottom of the barrel were sandwiched into our compost pile, which I hope to use next spring in my new garden.

Making kelp fertilizer

You can see the gallon jug on the left is a lighter color of the one on the right. The one of the left came from the top of the barrel and the one on the right was the last gallon bottled. It has more “solids” in it and is just a bit goopy. Surprisingly, it doesn’t smell as bad as the one on the left!     Go figure

I already used the fertilizer when I planted my broccoli and brussels sprout seeds a month or so ago, and holy moly, this stuff works!  One of the great things about seaweed fertilizer

making seaweed fertilizer

These seedlings are only 3 days old! Impressive!

is that it contains something called gibberellic acid, which is a substance that helps seeds germinate.  I don’t want to brag, but my seeds were up in three days.  Three days!

The next time we visit the ocean and bring back some seaweed to make more fertilizer, we will be trying the fish tank aerator, and I will let you know how this works out.  Hopefully it will ease the smell and make it so that home brewed seaweed fertilizer is a lot more fun to make!  😉

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Another Top Bar Beehive and DWV

We lost our beehive last winter. Well, we didn’t LOSE the hive itself, it’s just that the colony of bees occupying it died, and their death was probably our fault!  We felt soooooo bad.top bar beehive death in winter

However, since we thoroughly enjoyed being beekeepers, we decided to just go all in, make another hive and order two sets (one queen and 3 pounds of bees in each set) so that we would have two!  Not only would we have more pollinators for our fruit/nut orchard and our vegetable/herb garden, but we would also enjoy more honey and bees wax with another hive.  Besides, it would also double our chances of success getting a hive to survive the winter!

new hive 1This spring, once Ray was up to it and well on his way to healing (that story here), he made another top bar hive box in pretty much the same manner as our last one.  We did change a few things so there would be better ventilation, but the dimensions are pretty much the same so that we can share the top bars with each other.  Making this hive took a lot less time because we knew what we were doing.  We will see how everything goes this year and if the colonies make it through the winter, but we are hoping to make our third hive next spring!  🙂 a new top bar beehive

We bought our bee packages from Oliverez Bees, just as we did last year.  Unfortunately, I didn’t get a picture of the install.  I could give you some excuses, but the truth is that I was so excited and nervous that I simply forgot!  However, I did get a shot of the bees through the window viewing area just a few short weeks after they were installed.  Holy cow, these gals are building comb like gangbusters!

But then, one day about a month ago I saw this…

new top bar hive

Ugh!  Is that the deformed wing virus caused by the varroa mite?  I did a lot of research and, yes, it was probably the DWV.  UGH! UGH!  What were we going to do?  We wanted to have organic hives and not use miticide.  In fact, one reason we decided to use top bar hives was that the cells are smaller in Top Bar Hives (TBH), which produce smaller bees faster, which reduces the impact of varroa mites!  We knew that, unfortunately, there was probably no way to get around having varroa mites, which can kill a colony, but instead we could try to control them.

new top bar beehive

The California Buckeye, sometimes called Horse Chestnut, has a beautiful bloom and is a gorgeous tree when in full bloom. Unfortunately, the pollen causes Deformed Wing Virus in honeybees!

Another potential cause of the deformed wing virus, however, is pollen collected from the California Buckeye tree, which causes this deformity in brood.  And we have seen some California Buckeye Trees around.  If this was the cause, and all the brood was not effected, then the colony might be okay.

Well, when the bee with DWV was found, we were at the beginning of another honey flow.  There were lots of flowers blooming – especially the blackberries! And the weather report said that we were in for a week or so of 100+ degree weather down in the valley, though thankfully it wouldn’t get that hot here.

In researching miticides, I read that you do not want to apply during either a honey flow or during extreme heat, so even if our hive was being infected with the DWV, we had no choice but to watch it die right in front of our eyes.  The worst part of watching the hive die was knowing that the other hive would probably also be effected.  UGH!

So, the heat came and went!  Let me tell you, it was Hot Hot Hot!

When we checked on the hives a couple of weeks later, it was amazing!  They had literally doubled in size!  They weren’t dying at all, they were thriving!!

new top bar beehive

The colony as seen through the observation window in the side of the hive.

 

So…  how could this be?  I was actually prepared for another funeral!  Time for more research (don’t you just love Google?), and I think I may have found the answer.  I read on an entomologist’s research paper that while honeybees can live in 130-140 degree temperatures in the hive, the varroa mite cannot!  Wow!

So, if the DWV was caused by the varroa mite, the heat may have come at just the right time!  Of course, if the DWV was caused by the California Buckeye tree, then we will probably see some young bees with DWV every year in the future because we cannot cut down all the Buckeye trees within a honeybee’s foraging radius, nor would we want to.

Our tango mandrin in full bloom. The honeybees just maul this tree when it is blooming!

Our tango mandrin in full bloom. The honeybees absolutely maul this tree when it is blooming!

What we can do is plant more flowering fruits and vegetables and ornamentals that are good for bees, to keep them foraging at home.

Right now we have a small vegetable garden where our bees forage, and there are also numerous wildflowers around. In the spring the bees can forage from our fruit and nut orchard. Once our house is built we plan to have grapes, boysenberries and blueberries and will also plant a few more fruit trees here and there.  Furthermore, I want to expand our herb garden, which at this point includes rosemary, thyme, oregano, lavender and sage, which I know the honeybees just adore!

Here it is mid-summer, and during a hive inspection I took a picture of some of the comb while Ray was lifting them up.  Although we didn’t plan to harvest any honey, we felt it was necessary to take one comb from the larger hive (the new one) as it was almost full. new top bar beehive The bees already had comb on about 2/3 of the top bars! A full hive is one that will potentially swarm, which is something you definitely do not want!  We also moved a few empty bars in around the center of the hive, to let the bees see that there was still a lot more room in there.

We chose one comb that had mostly capped honey and very little brood.  I extracted the honey by crushing the beeswax comb and hanging it in cheesecloth above a bowl for about twenty-four hours.  Once most of the honey had drained out of the comb, I put the beeswax on a paper plate and set it outside about 20 feet away from the beehives.  The bees clean the honey off the wax in a day or two.  I flipped the wax over and the bees obligingly cleaned up the rest of the honey.  I put the almost clean beeswax into the freezer and will finish cleaning it up later.

new hive 4

We got about a cup of honey from this small harvest.  This honey is very sweet and a bright golden yellow – perfect for cornbread!  Yummmmmm…

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Our Tiny Cottage

Here is the tour of our cottage I promised a few months ago…

But first, some history.

While we are building our new home, we are living in our travel trailer.  Unfortunately, we have discovered that travel trailers were not meant to be lived in – they are basically tin cans that don’t have much insulation.  To make matters worse, cooking in the trailer only adds moisture to the air, which condenses and collects on windows and doors. Everything was damp.  Our bedding, the upholstered seats, bath towels, and our clothes.  Yuck!  We needed a warm, dry spot to sleep!

Don't Live in a travel trailer

The “NEW” tool shed.  You can see how we built it HERE

So, we built another shed (let’s see: a laundry shed, the first tool shed now turned into our tiny cottage, and the new tool shed.  That’s a lotta sheds!), moved everything from the first tool shed  to the new tool shed, and then turned our first tool shed into our new tiny cottage! We bought the kit for the new tool shed at one of those “big box stores” on sale. Despite the instruction manual being written like a Japanese cook book (thank goodness for pictures) we got it all put together in a couple of weeks, including a nice foundation.

This is the cute little wood stove wecooking on a small wood stove bought last spring as a way to cook outside during the summer.  It worked really well! Chicken and dumplings, pork roast, beef stew, navy beans and ham!  We could eat these great meals without heating up the trailer to cook our meals. The stove itself cost less than $200.

When we decided to put the little stove into the tiny cottage, we discovered that the pipes and everything that goes with it to safely vent the smoke outside cost almost twice as much as the wood stove itself!

Was it worth it?  You betcha!  That little stove really cranks out the heat.  In fact, when we were breaking in the pipes (the paint really stinks when you have your first few fires), Ray checked the temperature at the peak of the ceiling – 100 degrees!  Yup – it works well!

Building a Big Box Store Shed

Cooking on the woodstove in our new tiny cottage!

The best part?  When it’s cold and we have the wood stove fired up, I can cook on it!  Our first meal on the stove was a cozy beef stew with biscuits!  Yum!  And I can have a cup of tea almost any time I want it!  We leave the tea kettle on the stove because heating with a wood stove can make the air too dry, and the gently simmering water adds moisture to the air.  Ironic, isn’t it?  In our new tiny cottage we need to worry about having enough moisture!

Living in a tiny cottage

My new favorite place to sit with a cup of tea, a good book and a glowing fire! Cozy!

The rocking chair next to the stove came from our previous home in the valley.  It is small and doesn’t take much room, which works well in this tiny cottage, but is very comfortable. When it’s really cold and raining outside, it is just so cozy to sit in the chair with a good book and a cup of tea or coffee.  The firewood is held in a wood carrier that my husband inherited from his mother.  He remembers sitting in it when he was a little boy, pretending he was sitting in a car!

The bunk beds were built for guests that stayed the night with us, and have been in the tool shed, now tiny cottage, for a few years now.

Living in a tiny cottage

Ray sleeps on the extra long twin on the bottom (he’s 6’2″ tall) and I have a regular twin on top. Now that we have moved in, we have begun customizing our spaces and Ray has built a couple of shelves at the head of his bed, big enough for his laptop, cell phone, wallet, keys, etc..  I want a storage headboard for mine, so I can store my books, magazines, hand lotion and extra reading glasses.  My dearest mounted a “ceiling fan” that bathes me with cool air and a cute little LED reading light. I needed that fan many times this past winter and spring because sometimes that wood stove works too well!  But now that the outside temperatures are getting much warmer, my favorite quiet time is laying on my bed on a hot summer day with the fan gently blowing a cool breeze while I am reading my favorite magazine, Mother Earth News!

In the meantime, while I wait for Ray to build my storage headboard, I put everything on the loft shelf that is just above the head of my bed. Wanna hear a funny story?

Tiny Cottage One night, I heard Ray stirring as he was getting up to use the outhouse.  I figured since I was awake, I would use it also.  It was dark, very dark, but I was able to make my way down the bunk to the cottage floor, out the door where a motion detector light led my way to the outhouse.  Back in the cottage, I climbed up the bunk and lunged into bed, totally forgetting the loft shelf.  Wham!  I hit my head about one inch above my eyebrows, front and center.  I saw stars…  lots of stars!  The next morning, I told Ray what had happened, and as I brushed my rumpled hair aside, I could feel quite a lump.  Ray started laughing.  I ran to the mirror to see what appeared to be a unicorn horn trying to erupt through my forehead!

Can you see the black pipe wrap turned bumper pad that Ray put on the edge of the Loft shelf that very next day?  Yeah.  He knows me all too well.

On with the tour.

At the end of the bunk beds, Ray installed some hooks so we couldTiny cottage tour hang up our TV trays. These trays come in handy when we are eating in the cottage or using our laptops.

Behind the bed is Rays dresser and storage drawers.  It sure is nice to have dry clothes!

You can also see my magazine rack, chock full of magazines, a battery operated lamp and my CD player.  Everything is so handy, and even though the actual room is very small (10×12), we have everything in there that we need for comfortable survival!  The truth is, we are living better than probably 75% of the world in this tiny cottage.  We are warm and dry.  We have food and clean water.  We have lights, satellite TV, and refrigeration.  Plus, this is all temporary.

On the opposite side of the cottage from the bunk bed is my dresser (did I tell you how nice dry clothes are?) and the TV.  Our solar panel system supports a satellite TV receiver for two TV’s, along with the TV’s, a porch light and an interior light, my ceiling fan and LED light, and a small refrigerator/freezer.

Our flat screen TV, my dresser, a refridgerator/freezer and organized storage above. What else could we need?

Our flat screen TV, my dresser, a refrigerator/freezer and organized storage above. What else could we need? Can you see the CO2 detector in the right upper corner?  Yup, we have that and a smoke detector that you can’t see in the picture.  Safety first, you know!

Ray installed a long shelf above to store coffee, tea, mugs, paper towels, napkins, sugar, plates, etc, and I found these cute fabric storage cubes at one of the Dollar Stores so that it looks neat and organized.  One thing I have learned about tiny living is that when everything is organized and appears neat and clean (clutter is my worst enemy), I am much happier and feel a lot less stress.

Now, the only reason to go into the trailer is to shower, cook (if I’m not cooking on the wood stove or the solar oven) and retrieve food in storage!  The only thing we don’t have in the cottage is running water.  But, again, it’s only temporary!  Besides, there’s always the outhouse 🙂

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These are some of the places I party:

Thank Goodness It’s MondayClever Chicks Blog HopGrand SocialMix It Up MondayCreate, Link, Inspire;  Amaze Me MondayMotivation Monday;  Homemaking Mondays; Show & Share TuesdayThe Gathering SpotTuesday Garden PartyBrag About ItTuesdays with a Twist;The ScoopTwo Cup TuesdayTweak It TuesdayInspire Me TuesdaysTuesdays at Our Home;   Lou Lou GirlsParty In Your PJ’sYou’re Gonna Love It  Make, Bake and Create;  Wicked Awesome Wednesday;  Wined Down Wednesday;  Wake Up WednesdayFluster’s Creative Muster;  Homestead Blog HopWow Us Wednesday;  Wonderful WednesdayOur Simple Homestead; Share Your Cup Thursday;  Home and Garden Thursday;  The Handmade HangoutCreate it Thursday;  Think Tank Thursday;  Homemaking PartyTreasure Hunt ThursdayThis Is How We Roll; Inspire or be Inspired;  Inspiration Gallery;  No Rules Weekend Party Freedom FridaysFriendship FridayFrom The Farm Blog HopFriday Flash Blog PartyWeekend re-Treat;Family Fun FridayFriday’s Five FeaturesReal Food FridaysShow Off FridayCraft Frenzy Friday;  Awesome Life FridaySimply Natural Saturdays;  Saturday Sparks;  My Favorite Things;  Dare to ShareScraptastic Saturday;Share It One More Time  That DIY Party;  DIY Sunday ShowcaseSnickerdoodle Sunday;   Best of the BlogosphereSmall Victories Sunday

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