Brewing Ginger Ale

I keep hearing that fermented foods are good for you, and I do like yogurt. I also like beer and wine – those are fermented foods… ¬†right? ūüôā

                    Black Bart

Black Bart

When I was a little girl we enjoyed camping in the Sierra Nevada Gold Country and on our way we sometimes¬†stopped at a steak/hamburger joint called Black Bart’s. ¬†The story I remember (no guarantees this is fact, just memories of good times from years ago) is that the restaurant used to be a saloon of sorts and Black Bart himself, a famous bandit at the time, used to frequent this establishment. ¬†One of the drinks on the menu was sasparilla and another was ginger ale. Real brewed sasparilla and ginger ale. ¬†But, because I was a little girl, I couldn’t drink it because it¬†contained alcohol! Ginger ale with alcohol? ¬†Well… of course. ¬†Why do you think they call it ale? ¬†The recipe I found called it ginger beer, probably because Americans forget that an ale is an alcoholic drink, unlike the chemically laden¬†stuff you buy at the store to mix with your drinks. ¬†And Sasparilla? ¬†Well, that’s what eventually became known as root beer. ¬†Beer! ¬†Of course, commercial sodas¬†sold in grocery stores worldwide do not have alcohol. I found several recipes online to make ginger ale and they all looked pretty easy, so I decided to dive right in. ¬†All you need is some fresh ginger root (it’s actually a rhizome, but whatever), organic sugar and filtered water.

How to make ginger ale

All you need to make ginger ale – sugar, water and ginger! ¬†Couldn’t be simpler.

This is the recipe I used – of course I tweaked it just a bit:

Make the Ginger Bug:

Home brewed ginger ale

This is about day 5. You can see the bubbles around the rim and in the middle after the bug has been agitated.

Day 1 finely chop up about 3 teaspoons of peeled ginger, add to 1-1/2 cups of filtered room temperature water and then add 3 teaspoons of organic sugar. ¬†Stir to dissolve sugar. ¬†Every day after add about 2 teaspoons of the finely chopped ginger and 2 teaspoons of the organic sugar and stir. ¬†It’s actually best to stir twice a day. ¬†Also, never use a metal spoon. ¬†Apparently metal reacts with the acids in the ginger ale – and not in a good way. ¬†By about day 3 or 4¬†you will see the mixture turn cloudy – that’s good. ¬†Then, about day 5 or 6 you should be seeing small bubbles appear around the edges, especially when you stir or agigate the mixture. ¬†By day 7 or 8 and at least by day 10 you should see a little bubbly foam rise up when sugar is added to the mixture. ¬†Now the ginger bug is ready to be made into ginger ale!

Making Ginger Ale

Fermenting (brewing) the ginger ale. Notice the plastic tub, just in case the glass explodes! ¬† Hmmm¬†– it’s almost done! ¬† I can hear it now… ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ‚ô™‚ôę‚ô™‚ô™‚ôę‚ôę‚ô™ Oh Susannah… ¬†‚ô™‚ô™‚ôę‚ôę‚ô™‚ôę‚ô™

To make the ginger ale, first take care of your bug. ¬†Strain the ginger bug through a cheesecloth or coffee filter into a large container (a 1 gallon container with a tight lid is perfect). ¬†Wash out the original container the ginger bug was in and place the used ginger back into this jar. ¬†Now add 1-1/2 cups filtered water, 2 teaspoons each of the finely chopped ginger and sugar, and you now have a new ginger bug. Feed it just like you did before. If you don’t want to make a new batch of soda every week, you can keep the bug in the refrigerator. ¬†Just feed it once a week and it will stay alive. ¬†Once you want to make soda again, take it out of the fridge, feed it, and in a couple of days it should be ready to go again. Back to the ginger ale – now add the juice of three lemons, 3/4 cup of your organic sugar and 1/2 gallon of filtered water to the container. ¬†Seal the top down tight. ¬†If you are using a glass container, as I did, beware that the pressure inside the jar could ¬†cause the glass to explode! ¬†Be sure to open the jar once a day to prevent explosions. ¬†You can see from my picture that I used a Vlassic Pickle jar that had a metal lid, so I was careful to avoid letting the metal touch the ginger ale. ¬†Also, the lid was one of those “pop top” type – like canning jars – and I was able to tell if there was a lot of pressure in the jar if the top was popped upward and I couldn’t push it down! ¬†I also kept the jar inside a larger container – just in case. ūüôā ¬†Alternative you could keep it in a plastic container. ¬†I personally prefer not to use plastic when possible. Let the ginger ale ferment for about 5 or 8 days. ¬†You will know it’s ready when you get a lot of fizz upon opening the jar – just like soda! ¬†Once it reaches that point it is ready to drink. ¬†Put it into the refrigerator and in a few hours you will have yourself a nice cold refreshing fizzy drink. ¬†And it’s good for you!

Brewing Ginger Ale

Ahhhh… A nice cold glass of freshly brewed ginger ale! ¬†And it’s good for you!

Oh – about the alcohol. ¬†All of the web sites say it’s negligible – less than 1%. ¬†In fact, some over-ripe bananas may have more alcohol than the ginger ale when properly brewed. ¬†You see, most alcoholic ales (or beer) are brewed for 6, 8 or even 10 weeks to get the alcohol content up. The ginger ale takes quite a bit less time than that – thank goodness! For my next experiment I am going to try making strawberry soda using the ginger bug. ¬†Apparently, once you have a good ginger bug going, you can make all sorts of sodas, by adding different ingredients into the fermentation stage. ¬† Also, once the bug is going good and strong you can substitute most of the sugar with honey. ¬†It will give the resulting ginger ale a different flavor, but the resulting drink will be doubly good for you!

Ginger ale fermenting

This little piece of ginger may some day be a much larger plant with several pounds of ginger root – enough to keep me supplied with naturally carbonated sodas!

By the way – after making my second batch, I found that my last piece of ginger was trying to grow! ¬†Poor thing. ¬†I read (during my research on how to make ginger ale) that you can easily grow ginger (yes, even the stuff you get at the grocery store) and harvest enough every year to keep your ginger bug alive without having to buy more ginger. ¬†Now that sounds pretty sustainable to me! ¬†So, I took the last piece of ginger that was growing and placed it into a pot. ¬†I sure hope it grows well, because I am liking this ginger ale! Have you ever brewed ginger ale before? ¬†I know there are quite a few variations on growing the ginger bug, including some that boil the root and water first, then add the sugar; and others that add yeast (isn’t that cheating?) ¬†This variation worked well for me, but I am always experimenting and tweaking recipes to make them better. ¬†Do you have any suggestions? 001 Shared at these fun parties:¬†¬†Freedom Fridays;¬†Friendship Friday;¬†From The Farm Blog Hop;¬†Eat, Create, Party;¬†Pinworthy Projects Party;Farmgirl Friday; ¬†Friday Flash Blog Party;¬†Weekend re-Treat;¬†Family Fun Friday;¬†Friday‚Äôs Five Features;¬†Real Food Fridays;¬†Friday Favorites;¬†Old Fashioned Friday;¬†Fridays Unfolded;¬†Inspired Weekend;¬†Anything Goes Linky;¬†Show Off Friday;¬†Craft Frenzy Friday;¬†Weekends Are Fun;Front Porch Friday;¬†City of Links; ¬†Super Saturday;¬†Show Stopper Saturday;¬†Simply Natural Saturdays;¬†Strut Your Stuff Saturday;¬†Saturday Sparks;Saturday Show & Tell; ¬†Show and Tell Saturday;¬†Spotlight Saturday;¬†My Favorite Things;¬†Get Schooled Saturday;¬†Serenity Saturday;¬†Simple Saturdays; Frugal Crafty Home;¬†That DIY Party;¬†Nifty Thrifty Sunday;¬†DIY Sunday Showcase;¬†Snickerdoodle Sunday;Submarine Sundays;¬†Simple Life Sunday;¬†Think Pink Sunday;¬†Homesteader‚Äôs Hop;¬†Sunday Showcase, Clever Chicks, Homestead Barn Hop, Natural Living Monday, ¬†Moonlight & Mason Jars;¬†The HomeAcre Hop;¬†Share Your Cup Thursday; ¬†Home and Garden Thursday;¬†Fabulously Frugal Thusday;Simple Lives Thursday;¬†Mountain Woman Rendezvous;¬†Catch A Glimpse Party;¬†Create it Thursday;¬†Time Travel Thursday;Think Tank Thursday;¬†Green Thumb Thursday;¬†Krafty Inspiration;¬†Homemaking Party;¬†Treasure Hunt Thursday;¬†All Things Thursday;¬†¬†Inspire Us Thursday

Harvesting Rosemary

As many of you know, we are preparing our home in the Sacramento Valley to sell, so we can eventually move up to our future homestead.  One chore for dear hubby last weekend was to trim the bushes in our backyard to make it look more tidy, which included the huge rosemary bush that was threatening to completely engulf our pool deck and take a plunge!

Dehydrating Rosemary

A few sprigs of rosemary, ready to be stripped of it’s leaves.

Every year at Christmastime I enjoy decorating with rosemary.  It is a beautiful evergreen bush that smells absolutely devine.  In fact, all I usually do is take a few sprigs (about the same amount in the picture above) and tie a beautiful red ribbon around the top!  Simple, beautiful, elegant.   I also enjoy cooking with rosemary, so instead of throwing all the beautiful herb into the compost pile, I decided to dehydrate some to keep on hand.

Dehydrating Rosemary

The final rinse.

The first thing to do with the rosemary is to strip the leaves off it’s woody stem. ¬†If you plan to barbecue, save¬†the stems to use as ¬†shish kabob sticks! ¬†They add a wonderful flavor to meats (excellent on lamb and chicken) and most vegetables. If you are using them right away, you are good to go. ¬†Otherwise soak them for an hour or two before using them, so they don’t burn.

Next, thoroughly rinse¬†the leaves in cold water. ¬†Then rinse¬†again. ¬†It’s amazing how much dirt the rosemary will give up when washed! ¬†I think it holds onto dirt because of the amount of oils held in the leaves. ¬†Anyway, I washed mine four times before I didn’t see dirty/cloudy water anymore! ¬†Preserving Rosemary

Next, spread the leaves out on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper, or put into your dehydrator. ¬†That’s it. ¬†Seriously! ¬†They dry nicely in a day or two on the parchment paper, or in just a few hours in a dehydrator. ¬†I put mine into a spice bottle, but you can just as easily store yours in a mason jar with a lid.

One of my favorite recipes to use rosemary is in focaccia bread.  The recipe below uses both rosemary, parmesan cheese and sea salt.  It is so good as is, but would also make an excellent pizza crust.  You can cut the bread into strips for dipping into a marinara sauce or perhaps the iconic balsamic vinegar/olive oil mixture.  Or, just eat it plain out of the oven.  If you roll it pretty flat before baking, you can also use the focaccia as a sandwich bread.  So good!

Rosemary Focaccia Bread

Rosemary/Parmesan Cheese Focaccia Bread

ROSEMARY and PARMESAN CHEESE FOCACCIA BREAD

1 tsp raw white sugar               2 cups all-purpose flour

1 packet active dry yeast         2 tbsps olive oil

1/3 cup warm water                 1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp parmesan/ shred           1 tbsp rosemary, roughly chopped

In a small bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar in the warm water.  Let it stand about 10 minutes until it is frothy.  In a large bowl, combine the flour and yeast mixture, adding water 1 tbsp at a time to make a soft dough.  knead briefly on a lightly floured surface.  Place into a lightly oiled large bowl, turn to coat with oil, cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until approximately doubled, which takes about 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. ¬†Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead just a few times. ¬†On a lightly oiled cookie sheet, roll or pat the dough out to an approximately 12″ circle. ¬†Brush with 1-2 tbsps of olive oil, sprinkle salt over, then rosemary, then parmesan. ¬†Bake for approximately 15 minutes, or until crust is golden.

Enjoy!

Rosemary plants

Three rooted rosemary plants waiting to be planted near our orchard on the future homestead!

Dearest hubby also found that some of the rosemary had rooted itself, so we pulled these up and put into a bucket of water.  The next time we go up to the future homestead, this rosemary will be planted on a downward slope that is right next to our fruit and nut orchard.  Not only will this be a great start of rosemary on the future homestead for eventual cooking, but deer do not like the scent of Rosemary, and doing this will deter them from the orchard.

Preserving Rosemary

Dehydrated Rosemary

Do you cook with rosemary?  An old friend of mine makes cookies with rosemary РI must remember to get her recipe!

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Choosing Pomegranate Trees

One plan my husband and I have upon moving up to our future homestead is to line the frontage of our property along the road with pomegranate and olive trees. ¬†We love pomegranate trees – pomegranate juice, pomegranate jelly, pomegranate wine… ¬†Need I say more? ¬†And then don’t get me started about them being called “superfruit”. ¬†The amount of antioxidants in pomegranates is phenomenal!

In the back yard of our current home in the valley, we were pleasantly surprised with a pomegranate tree a few years ago. ¬†It’s what we affectionately call our volunteer pomegranate, and it graced us with some fruit last year. ¬†The pomegranate fruits were small and a bit misshapen, but we loved them all the same. ¬†Unfortunately, the little bird who planted the tree for us didn’t tell us what variety it is, but we suspect it is a “Wonderful” as that is the variety most of the local nurseries in our area offer, and this variety is also the one grown next door. ūüôā

How to choose a pomegranate tree

Our four-year-old (I think) Volunteer Pomegranate tree in full bloom. The ground is already littered with blossoms already, yet there are still more buds on the tree!

Last summer I happened upon two forlorn little pomegranate trees at our local discount grocery store.  They were the last two trees available, had broken and dead branches, and looked like they really needed some TLC. They were only 99 cents each!  I am always a sucker for an underdog (and a bargain basement deal), so I snatched them up, brought them home and potted them into some fairly big pots. Then I gave them some love.

This year, as small as they are, they decided they were happy enough to bloom! ¬†Of course, they couldn’t¬†compete with the larger volunteer tree (which was covered in blossoms), but bloom they did! ¬†Unfortunately, like the larger tree, I am not positive¬†what variety of pomegranate the babies are. ¬†There were no tags, no labels, just written on the pot the words “pomegranate”.

Varieties of pomegranates

Here is one of the one-year-old trees in bloom! I think 99 cents was a bargain!

So, although I am happy with my two baby trees no matter what variety they are, I decided to do some research on what other type of pomegranate tree we will be planting up on our future homestead, because it will be time to buy them and plant them before you know it!

My favorite place to buy trees of any kind is at the Peaceful Valley Nursery in Nevada City here in California. ¬†All of the trees in our orchard on the future homestead have come from this nursery and we haven’t been disappointed yet!

Choosing variety of pomegranate trees

A baby pomegranate! We haven’t seen very many bees this year (darn Monsanto and Synergy) but apparently there were enough to get this one going! The hummingbirds, however, have been visiting nonstop!

So I decided to see what varieties of pomegranate trees this nursery offers, since this is probably where we will make our purchase again.  Right now the catalog shows pretty much every fruit tree is sold out because most of the trees they sell are bare root, and this is not bare root season.  However, having been a loyal customer of this nursery for several years, I know they usually carry the same stock year to year.

I have just a few requirements for my pomegranates: ¬†1. More juice than seed, 2. Can survive temperatures down to 25 degrees fahrenheit in the winter and up to 90 degrees in the summer, and 3. don’t need too much sugar to sweeten the juice.

Peaceful Valley Nursery carries six varieties of pomegranate:

Parfianka:  Large, deep red fruit with slightly acidic flavor.  Zones 8-10.  Harvest from Sept 5 to Oct 10.

Sweet:  The outside is greenish yellow with a slight blush, but is one of the sweetest varieties of pomegranate.  Zones 7-10.  Harvest from Sept 8 to October 12.

Kashmir:  Intense flavor that is non-acidic, medium sized.  Zones 8-10.  Harvest from Oct 1 to Nov 1.

Wonderful:  This variety (most common) has large fruit with a delicious, tangy flavor.  Zones 7-10.  Harvest from Sept 8 to Oct 12.

Ambrosia:  Huge fruits Рup to 3 x as big as the Wonderful with sweet-tart juice.  Zones 7-10.  Harvest from Sept 5 to October 10.

Eversweet:  Sweet, virtually seedless fruit. Clear, nonstaining juice.  Zones 7-10.  Harvest from September 10 to Oct 15.

Pomegranate flowers

Aren’t these the most beautiful, intensely orange-red flowers you have ever seen? And they are HUGE! No wonder the hummingbirds are attracted to them.

Since we are on the edge of¬†USDA Zone 7 (almost 8), I think I should eliminate the varieties that do not list Zone 7. Better safe than sorry. ¬†Although a pomegranate tree doesn’t mind a freeze and will die back a bit but be just fine the next year, a hard freeze for several days/nights in a row could kill the tree.

So, that leaves me with: ¬†Sweet, Wonderful, Ambrosia and Eversweet. ¬† Any of these should do well, but I am completely smitten with the Eversweet! ¬†Huge fruit, almost seedless, with clear, nonstaining, sweet juice! ¬†What’s not to love! ¬†I also want Ambrosia because of the size of the fruit! ¬†I would assume that large fruit makes harvesting and preparing easier (but, you know what they say about assuming). ¬† I am pretty sure we already have two Wonderful.

So РI think my order for next fall will be three Eversweet and three Ambrosia pomegranate trees!  That should be a good start.  My next research will take me into the world of olives. Yum!

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New Boxes from Old Fences!

I sighed.  Then I sighed again. Louder.

“What’s the matter?” dearest husband asked.

“Everyone has a garden but me. I miss having a garden”, I whined¬†pouted said.

“But we can’t have a garden, remember?”

This has been the general conversation around our house for the last month or so.  Every blog I read is gushing over with pictures of happy little seedlings peaking out of the ground, questions about whether the frost is finally over, and even those in the South who are already harvesting.

melon

I grew some wonderful melons last year!

I’m jealous. ¬†I had a garden last year and it was wonderful! ¬†I had a bumper crop of tomatoes and peppers, my black turtle beans did very well and I still have some green beans left in my freezer! ¬†My grandson and I had a beautiful crop of sunflower seeds that were at least 15 feet tall when all was said and done, with heads a foot across! ¬†I harvested some beets and a few misshaped carrots. ¬†I dealt with squash mosaic virus and ended up losing all of my zucchini plants to that dreaded disease – lessons learned. ¬†And the corn? ¬†Well, lets just say that it looked great, but I didn’t stagger my harvest so we only ate fresh corn for a couple of weeks. That’s okay – I froze the rest. ¬†My greatest pleasure was when my grandchildren came over to help. ¬†And also my first ever purple potato harvest! This year I still have remnants of last year’s garden with volunteer tomato, bean and sunflower plants. ¬†I potted up some of the tomatoes, but without garden space, the beans and sunflowers will just have to be tilled under for the sod. ¬†Sigh.

I had a beautiful bumper crop of anaheim chile plants last year.

I had a beautiful bumper crop of anaheim chile plants last year.

I miss gardening. ¬†But, we are preparing our home to sell (so we can move up to our future homestead – hooray!) and the real estate professionals say that gardens do not sell houses, pretty, green, un-ecological, water-wasting, nitrogen eating¬†lawns do. ¬†So, last year’s garden will soon be a sea of green sod. ¬†Sigh.

But, my husband loves me Рyes he does!  Last month he replaced one of our fences and still had most of the boards piled in a corner.  So, do you know what that sweetheart did?  He built me some raised boxes out of the old fence boards and set up an automatic irrigation system to boot up on our future homestead!  Did I tell you I have the best husband in the world?

Salvaged raised bed boxes

The old fence had seen better days, but we were going to give it a new life!

The boards are cedar and they are¬†still in fairly good shape. ¬†The 2×4 rails, however, had seen better days. But we picked through and found the best ones to build the¬†boxes with. Ray decided to make the boxes two boards high, or about 12″ tall. ¬†He used the 2 x 4’s as stakes and support, while the boards made the sides. ¬†When all of the pieces were assembled, Ray cut the pieces and parts on the tailgate of his pick-up truck. ¬†We decided to go with a 2′ x 5′ planting bed simply because after trimming all the rotten and split wood off the boards, this is the largest bed we could have!

Raised Garden Boxes out of Salvaged Wood

The ground is hard clay, which is another reason to build raised boxes for the vegetable garden. We were able to save that beautiful wild iris in the middle of the picture!

Once the raised box pieces and parts were cut, we needed to dig a bit of a hole in the dirt where each 2 x 4 post was going to go, fill it with water to soak into the clay soil, then dig a few more inches.  Whew Рthat was the hardest part!  Once the ground had softened a bit, Ray pounded the 2 x 4 posts into the ground until they were good and solid (he had cut a V in the bottom of each post).  Well, maybe that was the hardest part.

Then came time to screw the boards into the 2 x 4 posts.  A few of the boards cracked a little, but they generally held up good and solid, and so the boxes were done!

Now Ray set up an¬†automatic watering system because, sadly, we can’t be up on our future homestead all of the time. ¬†When we had the garden in our backyard last year we used a watering system that took advantage of the risers from¬†our previous lawn’s sprinklers (which will now be converted back to lawn sprinklers).

Raised box automatic watering gardening system

Here is the CIA (Central Irrigation Apparatus) of our watering system.

This watering “outlet hub” screwed into the risers and had eight ports ¬†to which the watering¬†lines are attached. ¬†Ray knew this would work well and he patterned our new¬†system¬†much like our gravity fed system we have worked out for our orchard, with an automatic timer. ¬†The hub was placed on a wooden stake to keep it upright, which was right smack dab in the middle of the boxes he built. ¬†He then cut the water lines to the lengths needed to reach the center of each planting box and attached them to the hub. ¬†The timer was hooked up to the spigot at the bottom of one of our 1,100 gallon water storage tanks and was set to run 15 minutes every morning.

The first test didn’t go so well. ¬†At first all eight water lines had water coming out the ends, then a couple lines sputtered and a few stopped water flow completely. ¬†Ray detatched the water hose from under the hub and discovered that ants had set up a nest in the hose, and had caused a blockage in the hub system! ¬†Ugh. ¬†After that was cleared we tried again. ¬†Perfect!

I filled the boxes with some¬†purchased organic garden soil, some native clay soil, and some of our lovely compost, planted the volunteer tomatoes and watered them in. ¬†It’s a good thing we got them transplanted because their roots were coming out of the bottom of the hole in the pot and a few got torn during the transplant! ¬†Because of this, I was worried that they might wilt, so I gave them an extra dose of water. It will be fun to see which type of tomatoes these turn out to be. Last year I grew¬†4 different types of tomatoes, from yellow and red heirlooms to some really good sweet-as-candy grape tomatoes.

Old Fence becomes Planter Boxes

The tomatoes finally have a home where they can spread their roots! ūüėČ

The next morning I checked on them and – sure nuf – they had been watered by the automatic system (yes!) and they were not wilted at all (double yes!). ¬† Next week I will get some more plants for the other boxes Ray built – maybe peppers – although it might be a bit late for this season. ¬†But, at least the boxes will be ready for a fall crop! ¬†ūüôā

So now I have a vegetable garden afterall, even if it’s just a couple of tomato plants! ¬†I may not get to see it but once every other week or so. ¬†Yeah – I may even end up with a lot of rotten tomatoes because I won’t be there to pick them every day. ¬†But at least I have a garden now.

I just wish I could be there every day to tend to it!  Sigh.

While I can’t garden every day, perhaps I can live vicariously through YOUR garden! ¬†So – please tell me – how does your garden grow?

Our Three Peas
Green Thumb Thursday

 

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I am joining these parties: The Backyard Farming Connection Hop; Nifty Thrifty Tuesday; The Gathering Spot; Tuesday Garden Party; Garden Tuesday; Brag About It; Tuesdays with a Twist; The Scoop; Two Cup Tuesday; Tweak It Tuesday; Inspire Me Tuesdays; Tuesdays at Our Home; Turn It Up Tuesday; Pinterest Foodie;  Make, Bake and Create; Cottage Style Party;  Wicked Awesome Wednesday; Whatever goes Wednesday; Show and Share Wednesday; Wined Down Wednesday; What We Accomplished; Moonlight & Mason Jars; Wake Up Wednesday; Fluster’s Creative Muster; Work It Wednesday; Whatever Wednesday; LouLou Girls; Wonderful Wednesday; The HomeAcre Hop; Share Your Cup Thursday;  Home and Garden Thursday; Fabulously Frugal Thusday; Mountain Woman Rendezvous; Create it Thursday; Think Tank Thursday; Green Thumb Thursday;  Homemaking Party; Treasure Hunt Thursday; All Things Thursday;  Inspire Us Thursday; Linkn Blogs; Wildly Original;  Freedom Fridays; Friendship Friday; From The Farm Blog Hop; Eat, Create, Party; Pinworthy Projects Party;Farmgirl Friday;  Friday Flash Blog Party; Weekend re-Treat; Family Fun Friday; Friday’s Five Features; Real Food Fridays; Friday Favorites; Old Fashioned Friday; Fridays Unfolded; Inspired Weekend; Anything Goes Linky; Show Off Friday; Craft Frenzy Friday; Weekends Are Fun;Front Porch Friday; City of Links; Super Saturday; Show Stopper Saturday; Simply Natural Saturdays; Strut Your Stuff Saturday; Saturday Sparks;  Show and Tell Saturday;  My Favorite Things; Get Schooled Saturday;  Frugal Crafty Home; That DIY Party; Nifty Thrifty Sunday; DIY Sunday Showcase; Snickerdoodle Sunday;Submarine Sundays; Simple Life Sunday; Think Pink Sunday; Homesteader’s Hop; Sunday Showcase

 

 

 

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