Gertrude and her snakelets

The year after we finished our tool shed/guest house, we discovered a new occupant living under the concrete ramp leading up to the door.  We called her Gertrude.

Gertrude would greet us almost every morning.  When she felt the vibrations of someone walking up the ramp, she would stick her head out as if to say “who goes there?”.  Previous to Gertrude’s residence, we had a lot of blue-bellied lizards hanging around the tool shed.  They would laze on the concrete porch in the morning because it was still radiating heat from the day before.  The lizards would also make their home under the door or up under the first row of siding, where there were little cracks large enough to squeeze into.  Then came Gertrude.  We haven’t seen a lizard there since!

Here is Gertrude, our Mountain Gartersnake, peeking out of her den in the morning.  We suppose she felt a vibration when we walked up the concrete ramp and came out to see who was making all the ruckus!

Here is Gertrude, our Mountain Gartersnake, peeking out of her den in the morning. We suppose she felt a vibration when we walked up the concrete ramp and came out to see who was making all the ruckus!

Not that we mind.

If you will recall, because of all the slash piles left on our property when it was logged many years ago, we have an abundance of wood rats and deer mice.  When we did a little research to find out what kind of snake Gertrude was, we found that she is a Mountain Gartersnake  or Thamnophis elegans elegans (the name fit her well as we thought she was very elegant) and these gartersnakes are fond of mice and completely harmless to humans.  We welcomed Gertrude to her new home.

Here is Gertrude out for her morning hunt!  When Gertrude was around we didn't have any mice, lizards or grasshoppers!  She was a good little snake to have around!

Here is Gertrude out for her morning hunt! When Gertrude was around we didn’t have any mice, lizards or grasshoppers! She was a good little snake to have around!

The next spring Gertrude was nowhere to be found.  We waited for her to pop up from her den, but she didn’t.  We were sad in a weird sort of way.  After all, we enjoyed showing our pet snake Gertrude to family and friends who came up to visit.

Then, one day we found a baby Mountain Gartersnake on the front porch of the tool shed.  Gertrude was a momma!

Here is a picture of Gertrude's baby all coiled up and probably scared to death.  Poor thing.  She didn't last long.  She decided to take a nap just under the shed door one day, and when the door was opened the weatherstrip almost cut her head off, and she was mortally wounded.  So sad.

Here is a picture of Gertrude’s baby all coiled up and probably scared to death. Poor thing. She didn’t last long. She decided to take a nap just under the shed door one day, and when the door was opened the weatherstrip almost cut her head off, and she was mortally wounded. So sad.

But, unfortunately, before we could name the new baby, she got tangled in the door of our shed and was mortally wounded.  🙁    That was last spring and we hadn’t seen any of these Mountain Gartersnakes since –  until this past weekend!

Here is our newest Mountain Gartersnake!  Isn't she cute!  You can tell how small she is in comparison to the fern.

Here is our newest Mountain Gartersnake! Isn’t she cute! You can tell how small she is in comparison to the fern.

I am proud to say we have a new baby Mountain Gartersnake who has taken up residence under the wooden stairs leading up to our trailer door!  This baby snake let me get so close to take these pictures, I could swear she was posing!  Perhaps she knew I didn’t mean any harm.  Or perhaps she was so blinded by the flash she couldn’t see to move!  🙂  I would assume that she is Gertrude’s grandbaby, but perhaps we have more garter snakes around than we realize.  Now we need to think up a name for the new snake.   I was actually thinking of calling her Mabel or Beulah, but I’m open to suggestions.

Here is what I think is probably Gertrude's grandbaby.  She let me get really close so that I could get a picture.  I think she was posing :-)

Here is what I think is probably Gertrude’s grandbaby. She let me get really close so that I could get a picture. I think she was posing 🙂

The warm-hearted fuzzies we felt with Gurtrude and her snakelets isn’t at all like the feeling I had last year when I almost stepped on a rattlesnake!  We live in an area where we will encounter a rattler once in a while.  It’s just something that comes with the territory.  Normally we wouldn’t bother with a rattlesnake and just let them be (they eat rats and mice), but this one was too close to our trailer and shed area, and we had grandchildren coming up the next day.  Since it was a pretty good sized one and we are not at all trained in catch and release of venomous snakes, we decided it was best to “take care” of the situation.

The "nicer" end of a rattlesnake.  When we showed this picture to our neighbor, he couldn't believe we didn't eat the snake!  Eeewww.  No thank you.

The “nicer” end of a rattlesnake. When we showed this picture to our neighbor, he couldn’t believe we didn’t eat the snake! Eeewww. No thank you.

Hopefully we will have many more of the Mountain Gartersnake visits and no more rattlesnakes, but only time will tell.  If anyone knows a way of getting rid of rattlesnakes in a humane and safe way, I would certainly be glad to know how.  But I must tell you that even seeing the rattlesnake dead gave me the heebie-jeebies!

 

Shared at:  Farmgirl Friday Blog Hop, Garden Tuesday, The Backyard Farming Connection Hop #30

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DIY Bed Warmer (and Cooler)

Brrrrr..... it's cold outside!

Brrrrr….. it’s cold outside!

You know how it is.  It’s winter and it’s cold, no, it’s actually freezing outside.  It’s time to go to bed and you just know that bed is actually made of ice. Of course after about 15-20 minutes of pure misery (don’t move, don’t move) the sheets will finally warm up and then everything is fine for the rest of the night, thanks to your down comforter.  Right?

Well, next winter you can prevent this scenario with your own rice (or corn or beans) bed warmer!  Just pop it in the microwave for 3-4 minutes, roll it out in your bed under the covers, and in just a few minutes, there you have it:  a toasty warm bed to crawl into!  It is simple to make and very effective!

But wait, there’s more!  So you say “great, that’s wonderful, but winter is almost over”.  Well, just pop the bed warmer (ahem, now bed cooler) into the freezer and there you go – a nice cool bed on those hot summer nights!

All you need is some fabric, thread, stuffing (rice, flax, corn, beans, peas, cherry pits, most anything organic, clean and dry works) and a bit of time!

DIY BED WARMER TUTORIAL

Lets start with the fabric.  I know some of you will run out and buy some thick muslin or fancy fabric, but save your money.  The heat (or cold) comes from the stuffing, not the fabric.  You would be better off spending your money on an organic cotton or linen fabric.  Only buy as much as you need or use what you already have.  I am 5’6″ tall, so I bought 2 yards of 36″ wide organic muslin.  After the fabric is pre-shrunk and the seams are sewn, it will be about 5’6″ long, perfect for me.  Children will need shorter bed warmers.  Prewash the fabric and then press it with an iron.  Believe me, you will be glad you did.

Once this is done, fold the fabric in half lengthwise.  This made mine about 17″ wide (I lost an inch or so to shrinkage).  Before you start sewing anything at this point, however, you should check to see that the fabric will fit into your microwave!  Since my microwave is 20″ wide on the inside, I know that my bed warmer is sure to fit.  Now with the fabric inside out, sew the top and bottom seams.

Sew a seam along the top and bottom, inside out.  Trim off excess

Sew a seam along the top and bottom, inside out. Trim off excess

Turn to right side out, poke the corner out and press the seam down.  Next, sew a seam down the middle to make two halves, and then make another seam down the middle of each half. Use tailor’s chalk to get a straight line.  Some people can just use straight pins to do this.  Me?  I need both!   I just got a new sewing machine and this gave me the opportunity to try out some of the decorative stitches. 🙂  You can sew straight stitches, zigzag, wavy or like I did, you can sew the most beautiful, creative, and awesome (I can’t belive how easy it is now) decorative

Turn right side out, poke corner out so it looks nice, then press the seam with an iron.

Turn right side out, poke corner out so it looks nice, then press the seam with an iron.

stitches.  The only thing that really matters at this point is that you sew a continuous seam from one side of the fabric to the other.  Back tack on both sides so that the stitching doesn’t come unraveled!

First sew a seam down the very middle.  Use any style stitch you want.  It's easiest and fastest just to use a straight stitch, but that wouldn't be as much fun!

First sew a seam down the very middle. Use any style stitch you want. It’s easiest and fastest just to use a straight stitch, but that wouldn’t be as much fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three seams are sewn, not including the ends, making four panels

Three seams are sewn, not including the ends, making four panels

Now comes the math part!  Actually, just get out your ruler and figure about how wide you want each pocket to be – mine are about 2 inches wide (give or take).  Anything less than 1-1/2 inch isn’t really good because it’s harder to get the filling to move around in tighter spaces.  If you are using beans or corn, you may want the pockets to be at least 3 inches wide.  Play around with it.  There is no hard and fast rule here!  Measure between the seams you already have and divide that measurement by how wide you want your pockets to be.  If you have 12 inches between seams and you want 3″ pockets, then you need to sew three seams between each of your first seams.

Measuring between the seams.  Pockets should ideally be between 2-3 inches wide, depending on what kind of filling you are using.

Measuring between the seams. Pockets should ideally be between 2-3 inches wide, depending on what kind of filling you are using.

 

Now just go ahead and sew all of your seams.  This is the part that takes a while if you change thread colors and/or stitches.  I decided to make every other seam using a decorative stitch and I sewed all of these first.  Then I went back and sewed a straight stitch between every decorative stitch.

Once all of the seams are done, turn the already closed edge over once (or twice if you like!) and sew that side all the way down from top to bottom.  This step is optional, but if you want both sides to look the same, you should go ahead and do this.  Besides, the extra fold helps make the bed warmer a lot more sturdy so that it holds up better to wear and tear.

Turn and sew the edge that is already closed.  It isn't really necessary because this side would already hold the rice in, but it makes the whole thing stronger for wear and tear.

Turn and sew the edge that is already closed. It isn’t really necessary because this side would already hold the rice in, but it makes the whole thing stronger for wear and tear.

 

You are now ready to stuff.  I used 1/3 cup of long grain rice in each pocket for a total of 10 cups.  This measured out to about 4 pounds of rice.  I just rolled up a paper plate, stuck it into the pocket opening, poured in 1/3 cup of rice, then went on to the next pocket.  Word of warning:  Make sure when you have poured in the rice that it goes all the way down to the bottom of the pocket and work on a big table so none of the rice that has already been placed in a pocket spills out! 🙁  At this point you might think “that’s not enough filling!”

Trust me, it is.

I used 1/3 cup of rice in each pocket x 30 pockets = 10 cups of rice, or about 4 pounds.  A paper funnel comes in handy.

I used 1/3 cup of rice in each pocket x 30 pockets = 10 cups of rice, or about 4 pounds. A paper funnel comes in handy.

 

Once you have poured in all the rice (or whatever filling you choose to use) you should pin the final side seam over and sew that seam.  It’s essential that the stuffing stay on the opposite side while you are sewing, or the stuffing might spill out all over the place, or it may get in the way of the needle.  So easy does it at this point.

Rice all loaded up on one side of the pockets, with the opposite side seam all pinned and ready to be sewn shut.

Rice all loaded up on one side of the pockets, with the opposite side seam all pinned and ready to be sewn shut.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your done!

Aaaahhhh, a nice warm bed in the winter, cool in the summer!  Just please don't sleep under or over the bed warmer for safety reasons.  It can get really hot and you don't want to get burned!

Aaaahhhh, a nice warm bed in the winter, cool in the summer! Just please don’t sleep under or over the bed warmer for safety reasons. It can get really hot and you don’t want to get burned!

There are so many variations to make this your own.  If you wanted, you could make one for each member of the family using their favorite colors.  You can add a few tea bags to your rice (earl grey comes to mind, or even a nice vanilla) and this will give a gentle scent to the bed.  I read on the internet somewhere that you can put dried mint, lavender, rose petals or even rosemary in with the stuffing, but you have to be very careful that the bed warmer isn’t overheated, lest you burn the herb, which will make it stink!

So, here are a few precautions.  The first couple of times you heat your bed warmer in the microwave, warm it in 30 second increments and test it before you warm for another 30 seconds, remembering that it gets warmer in the middle. Do Not Overheat!  If using dried corn, please make sure it isn’t popcorn. 🙂  To prevent the potential for fires, place a small (I use an old shot glass) container of water in the microwave.  If you have a turntable in your microwave, turn it off.  Do Not Overheat! The first couple of times you heat the bed warmer in the microwave you will smell an odor of….. well …… rice (or beans, etc.), and it will give off just a bit of moisture.  That will eventually go away.  Did I tell you not to overheat the bed warmer?  When putting in the freezer, it’s best to put it in a dry plastic bag first.  That way it won’t stick to anything in the freezer and is less likely to absorb funky odors.  All this being said:  please don’t lay on or under the bed warmer.  It can get very hot and you don’t want burns. Be especially careful with the bed warmer around children.  It’s purpose is to warm the bed and then be set aside.

So there you go.  A perfect homemade gift (Christmas?) or a great beginning 4H sewing project.  I’m sure these bed warmer/coolers would sell like hotcakes at a craft faire or bazaar.  I’m selling them in my Etsy store, once I get it opened, if you don’t want to go through the trouble of making one!

Shared at:         Make, Bake and CreateDown Home Blog HopWildcrafting Wednesday;  Wicked Awesome Wednesday;Whatever goes Wednesday; Show and Share Wednesday; Wined Down Wednesday; What We Accomplished;  Project ParadeWake Up Wednesday; Fluster’s Creative Muster; Hump Day Happenings; Homestead Blog Hop; The Blogger’s Digest; Wow Us WednesdayThe HomeAcre Hop; Share Your Cup Thursday;  Home and Garden Thursday;  The Handmade HangoutCreate it Thursday;  Think Tank Thursday; Green Thumb Thursday; Homemaking Party; Treasure Hunt Thursday; All Things Thursday Inspire Us Thursday; Inspire or be Inspired; Project Parade; Inspiration Gallery; The Pin JunkieFreedom Fridays; Friendship Friday; From The Farm Blog Hop; Eat, Create, PartyPinworthy Projects Party;Farmgirl Friday;  Friday Flash Blog Party; Weekend re-Treat; Family Fun Friday; Friday’s Five Features; Real Food Fridays; Friday FavoritesOld Fashioned Friday; Fridays Unfolded; Inspired Weekend; Anything Goes Linky; Show Off Friday; Craft Frenzy FridayFront Porch Friday; No Rules Weekend Party; Friday Favorites; Giggles GaloreSay G’Day SaturdaySuper Saturday; Simply Natural Saturdays; Strut Your Stuff Saturday; Saturday Sparks;  Show and Tell Saturday;  My Favorite Things;  Dare to Share; Scraptastic SaturdayFrugal Crafty Home; That DIY Party; Nifty Thrifty Sunday; DIY Sunday Showcase; Snickerdoodle Sunday;  Simple Life Sunday; Think Pink Sunday; Sunday Showcase

 

Mushrooms

There is a fungus among us!  We have a lot of different types of  mushroom on our future homestead.  In the early fall after a drenching rain they seem to pop up out of the ground just about everywhere.  Then again in the spring, while the ground is still wet but the temperature is beginning to warm, we get some really beautiful ones.

Don't these look like dried apricots?

Don’t these look like dried apricots?

There are red ones, white ones and yellow ones that look like sea coral.  If I liked eating mushrooms, I might be more interested in finding out what type of mushroom we have.  But alas, to my husband’s chagrin, I’ve never been a mushroom eater.

This one looks just like sea coral or sea sponge!

This one looks just like sea coral or sea sponge!

The red ones are quite strikingly beautiful, but if I correctly remember some of the information I was taught in my junior college botany class,  the brightly colored ones are usually poisonous!

This picture doesn't show how vivid red this one is.  It really stands out even in the shade, but I'll bet it's poisonous!

This picture doesn’t show how vivid red this one is. It really stands out even in the shade, but I’ll bet it’s poisonous!

If anyone of you out there can identify any of the mushrooms I have pictured here, please let me know.  I don’t believe I would ever harvest any of them for my dinner plate, but I guess it would be good to know if there are any poisonous ones around, especially when the grandchildren come to visit!

We call this one the football helmet mushroom because, well, it looks like a football helmet!  It actually had a bronze color to it!  Beautiful!

We call this one the football helmet mushroom because, well, it looks like a football helmet! It actually had a bronze color to it! Beautiful!

With all that being said, I must confess that I have a book on identifying mushrooms.  I read the book with all the instructions on how to identify certain mushrooms but try as I might, I just can’t get the hang of it.  I can follow a sewing pattern fairly well and I have no problems following a cooking recipe, but as much as I try, I just can’t pinpoint the species of mushroom!  I guess part of that is because of the fear factor involved.  I wouldn’t want to decide a mushroom is edible, be wrong, and have disastrous results.  It happens.

I call this one the icky mushroom.  When it is done doing it's thing, it shrivels up, turns slimy brown and looks like dog poop!  Eeewwww

I call this one the icky mushroom. When it is done doing it’s thing, it shrivels up, turns slimy brown and looks like dog poop! Eeewwww

Perhaps someday I will get someone up there who has a lot of experience with the dear little fungi, but some of them aren’t so little.  I measured one that was 9 inches across!  That’s the size of most dinner plates!

These two white mushrooms aren't really as slimy as they look.  Kind of reminds me of raw pot stickers - how about you?

These two white mushrooms aren’t really as slimy as they look. Kind of reminds me of raw pot stickers – how about you?

Here’s an old joke that just came to mind:  One meek little male mushroom asked a beautiful female mushroom out on a date.  Sadly, she bluntly refused him.  He was quick to retort, however, that she was missing out on a great date because he was a fun guy!  Get it?  Fungi.            Oh.

Of all the mushrooms we have on our property, this one looks the least noxious!  But, I'm probably wrong.

Of all the mushrooms we have on our property, this one looks the least noxious! But, I’m probably wrong.

One thing I haven’t found on our property yet, however, is a fairy ring.  A fairy ring is a ring of mushrooms that is formed when the first or central mushroom sends out mycelium (kind of like a root system) in an arc or a circle.  The fruiting cap of the mushroom is the part you see and as the mycelium grows outward, the fruiting caps also grow outward sometimes in a very awe-inspiring circle or arc.  We found a quite impressive one in Fort Bragg, California, at the Pine Beach Hotel.  There is was in the lawn right outside of their lobby.  Have you seen a fairy ring?

Shared at:  The backyard farming connection hop, Tilly’s Nest – Down Home Blog Hop, Wilderness Wife – Wicked Good Wednesday Hop, Frugally Sustainable – Frugal Ways, Sustainable Days.
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Wildcrafting Wednesday
Wildcrafting Wednesday

Hobby Stick Horse

How to make a hobby horseLast spring I was busy helping Nikki, my daughter-in-law, make birthday party favors for her daughter (my granddaughter) Emery.  The party theme was “My Little Pony” and instead of buying a whole bunch of candy or cheap little trinkets that would be thrown away and forgotten, it was decided to make a stick horse for each child.

How to make a hobby horse

These are all the pieces and parts you will need to cut out. I have already sewn the ears and the gusset together.  All you need for the head is about 1/2 yard of fabric and stuffing!

Nikki found a wonderful tutorial online and it’s called the “strapping stick horse”, click here to see it.  This is where you get the pattern and a full tutorial with instructions and great pictures on how to make a “strapping stick horse”, or hobby horse, as I call it!

I am showing how we modified the horse a bit from the original, as you will see in the pictures, to make it easier to put together.  In our version, the mouth is not open, and we didn’t take the time to embroidery the eyes and nostrils (too much embroidery, too little time, too many hobby horses!), but instead used buttons and googly eyes.  If you are making only one or two of these you will have plenty of time to embroidery!

How to make a hobby horse

First things first – sew together the ears, iron them flat.

After I sewed the first one together, I realized that I could make them faster using an assembly line: all the ears first, then all the gussets, etc..  I also realized that it was easier for me to change around the order (from the original tutorial) each part of the face was sewn together.  I found that if I sewed the ears together first, next sewed the gusset in, next sewed the ears into the slits, then lastly sewing in the mane while closing up the back of the head – this was the easiest way to make sure the ears were even.

DIY hobby horse

This is where the ears are sewn into the slits. I waited until the gusset was sewn in before I cut the slits so that they would be even on the head.

The first one I made in the order of the original tutorial, and I found that it was really hard to get the ears even on the forehead.  Once you have the sewing done, you can follow the tutorial for embroidering the eyes and nose (or using buttons like I did) and then stuffing the head, inserting and securing the stick.  Probably the easiest way to secure the wad of stuffing and fabric on the end of the stick is to  drill a hole (or two) through the stick as well as the groove around the stick,  Use thick quilting thread and once you have secured the fabric in the groove, pass the thread through the hole once or twice also.  I have found that after a short amount of use, unless you drill the hole and pass the thread through it, the stick may come out of the head.

How to make a hobby stick horse

Once the ears are sewn in, you will be making the yarn “mane” and then sewing that in down the back of the head. Pin, pin, pin! That’s all I can say.

You can make the horse’s gusset a different color so it looks like a Palomino, and you can even use a pinkish color for the inside of the ears!  I think the horses “mane” looks best when two or more colors are used.  As far as customizing these, another thought would be to buy fabric and yarn to match your child’s favorite “My Little Pony”!

After having made several of these, I can tell you that it is hard working with very “stretchy” fabric, unless you are a sewing pro.  Also, when you are finished sewing the head together and are stuffing the head, try to stuff with as big a wad as possible at a time.

How to make a Hobby horse

This is the horse all sewn, ready for stuffing. If you are going to embroidery the eyes and nose, you should do that now. If you are using buttons for the eyes and nose, you can either sew them on now or after the head is stuffed.

 

Little wads make the head look a bit lumpy and bumpy. 😉  When sewing on the halter, again, we went the easy route.  You can see in the pictures below that we did a simplified version of a halter.

 

Let me tell you – those things were a hit and when all was said and done cost less than most party favors!  They also make great Christmas presents!  You don’t have to buy any batteries for it (your kids are the batteries), it doesn’t make any noise (but your kids certainly will), you don’t have to feed it and you can “park” it behind the door!

 

  • Caden Caden My grandson, Caden, all smiles with his stick horse. He picked out one with a curly blonde mane and a red halter. Yes, that is a jump house in the background. No, we didn't allow them in the jump house with their horses! 🙂
  • Mia Mia Mia, my wonderful first grandchild, with her yellow haltered stick horse. Each child got to pick out their own horse and I don't think there were any that were exactly the same! Looks like there some ridin' going on in the background
  • Amanda Amanda Amanda, my beautiful grand-niece, enjoying her stick horse. I loved that the horses had different colored halters and manes. Some of the manes were curly and some were straight. Some were only one color of yarn and some had multiple colors.
  • Group shot Group shot Here are some of the kids with their stick horse party favors! That's my little granddaughter, Emery (the birthday girl), in the front wearing pink (what else?)
  • My sister My sister This is my sister, Machell, trying out one of the horses! Sometimes I claim her, sometimes I don't, but I love her anyway!

 

But here’s the funny part – the whole time I was sewing these horse heads together, I had a song stuck in my head. Don’t they call that an “ear worm”?  Anyway, let me explain.  Any of you who have seen the series of “The Godfather” movies will remember the scene when the guy wakes up in the morning, throws back his bed covers and discovers the head of his very expensive racehorse.  Remember?  (eeewwwww)  Well, as I was making these horse heads the theme song for “The Godfather” was on a continuous loop through my head!  So, if you’ll forgive me, I just HAD to reenact that scene:

🙂

 

AAAAAAAHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!

AAAAAAAHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!

For any of you who would like to have a stick horse similar to this one but don’t want to bother making one, I am going to make several and place them in my Etsy store soon, so stay tuned!

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